Orion by Kamil Kosecki


New – Inspiring – Beautiful
Fantasy Notes Composer Kamil Kosecki
“Orion” from “Constellations for piano”
Discover more about Kamil Kosecki at http://www.kamilkosecki.com

Deja Vu by Bruce Stark


Listen to the Life with Fantasy Notes Contemporary classics, Moving Classics TV
“Feels like a tale told
Something done I didn’t do
Something known I never knew
Another me, another you
Funny thing, this deja vu”
Songs of Innocence: No. 3. Deja vu by American composer Bruce Stark

Ivan talks about his complete dedication to be a musician and why classical music will never be outdated.

What does music mean to you personally?

To answer this question, I must quote Nadia Boulanger: “Do not take the path of music unless you’d rather die than not to do so”. Music is tautological to my existence, it goes beyond having a meaning for me because it gives me meaning and purpose. Music is the absolute as it has the power to penetrate the human nature and transform it.

Do you agree that music is all about fantasy?

Oxford Dictionary defines fantasy as the faculty or activity of imagining impossible or improbable things. I do believe that music is absolute reality; it is one of the purest voice of our humanity, our consciousness. If something I believe if far from impossible or improbable, is Music. Now, that said, to achieve music, I think is necessary to have utmost honesty while embarking on a voyage through an internal and “idealistic” realm. When composing or performing, one needs to almost step into a fantasy or a dream to grab from that consciousness world what will be later materialized. But in the end, composing, conducting or performing, that fantasy that we experience is nothing more than a deep mirror in which we see or search for the reflection of our existence.

If you were not a professional musician, what would you have been?

It is very hard, and even frightening to think about a possible alternate life without music as my life’s path. But if that was absolutely necessary, I think I would be a philosophy professor, a chef or a penman. Often times I find myself enjoying the process of deep thinking, I consider is necessary to understand oneself, others and the world that surrounds us. Moreover, I do aim my life’s journey to knowledge and wisdom; two things that I know are unattainable in their wholeness in principle. Also, I absolutely enjoy cooking, I believe is a selfless craft, just as music. I think that is what I like so much about the culinary world. And, penmanship… I believe is an absolutely beautiful art, forgotten but beautiful.

The classical music audience is getting old, are you worried about your future?

Absolutely! But I’m not worried about the audience getting old, or about music disappearing because of the evident lack of support. Music is part of what makes a human what it is; music will always be there as long as humans roam the Earth. But I do fear the lack of education concerning what music is and its importance in our development, sense of meaning, cultural identity and health among other things. I am sure that music will not disappear, is far too definitive of our existence, but it concerns me the future of its support system, we must act with urgency to design an updated sustainable support mechanism for the continuity of music.

What do you envision the role of classical music to be in the 21th century? Do you see that there is a transformation of this role?

I don’t consider myself to be a purist, but I do not believe the role of classical music has ever changed nor it will change. I think that in the midst of a cultural makeover and globalizing world we have tried to present classical music in many different and creative ways, but its role and purpose, I believe continues to be the same. In the end, music is a metaphysical manifestation of our innermost being, expressed to touch and transform our soul. There is nothing else that can achieve that level of consequence and because of that I think that the role or purpose of classical music will maintain being as it has been.

When I say that classical music is searching for new ways or that the classical music is getting a new face, what would come to your mind?

Integration, education and equality. Those are the things that come to mind. When we talk about the “face” of classical music, it is unavoidable to talk about marketing and outreach. Classical music has long been labeled as outdated, yet every time a person is willing to receive it, his/her life changes. It is more than evident than the face of classical music has been changing and needs to continue its metamorphosis. But this needs to happen with the understanding of what it is, its importance, its effects, its meaning. We continue to perform the classics, but we also have never stopped to create the new, all this while continuing to the honest expression capable of affecting people… So, classical music, in essence, will never be outdated, and its face has to display that.

Do you think we musicians can do something to attract young generation into the classical music concerts? How will you proceed?

The answer to this quintessential question is education. But we need to disassociate the concept of education with the classroom. As musicians, it’s our responsibility to reengage people to the concert hall not only in a “music appreciation class” but everywhere. There have been many years of traditions, rather strict ones, that tend to intimidate concertgoers. Furthermore, classical music is not in the ears of everyone now-a-days due to different profit-generating frameworks that have risen. Classical music has been forced to operate under those frameworks. Clearly, that system is not working for art music. There is when the education play its role. We need to educate, talk, motivate people into understanding the “Why” of music. We need to enthusiastically share what we do not as an elitist thing but as a welcoming art form that exists to talk to you and to make you transcend, to help you know yourself better than you thought you did. And finally, us as musicians, we need to understand and remember that what we do is a selfless art; we do wat we do for others, and when that changes, we fail.

Tell us about your creative process.

Describing my composition process is difficult and easy at the same time. I could say that I just write down what is sounding in my head, but also, I could say that whatever will end on the paper, starts to “brew” inside my head (and heart) based on experiences, ideas, events, deep thoughts and, most importantly, my humanity and its emotions. Now, if we go to the actual “physical” craft; my composition process is direct. I go straight to the “paper” without any instrument as an intermediary; as I say poetically: “I compose as if someone or something were whispering in my ear delicately every note I have to write.” I have always done it that way, but also when you go directly to paper, you find yourself writing for each and every instrument you choose to write for, instead of writing the translation that the piano (or any other instrument used for the composition process) might give you, even more so if you are composing for other instruments that are not played with a keyboard. That said, using any instrument for the composition process, as Stravinsky said, is also an absolutely effective and practical way to compose. Once we go out of all the technical “stuff” surrounding the composition process, I believe that the best way to describe my process is with the word Honest, that is what I aim for always, to be honest and to pour myself on each note.

Can you give some advice for young people who want to discover classical music for themselves?

Just to listen. Explore classical music and listen. If you want to enter this fantastic and enriching world, just listen to the music and listen to yourself. You’ll find yourself experiencing things you’d never thought possible just by opening yourself up and letting music affect you in your innermost being. You’ll end up knowing yourself better than before and seeing life through new eyes. It is absolutely exciting!

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Maria tells us about why our times bring new possibilities to classical music and why innovative stagings, hybrid concerts are gaining more popularity.

maria malta

What does music mean to you personally?

Music is my life, I consider myself fortunate to call it my hobby and career.

Do you agree that music is all about fantasy?

I think that fantasy is an important aspect of music since it gives creative flight to the soul into an imaginary universe.

If you were not a professional musician, would would you have been?

Can’t think of anything I would rather do.

The classical music audience is getting old, are you worried about your future?

There are always uncertainties in the future, but one must focus and enjoy the present. I think classical music will always be a central part of music since it forms part of our culture and heritage.

What do you envision the role of classical music to be in the 21 century? Do you see that there is a transformation of this role?

I think the 20th century is presenting several new opportunities for classical music and musicians. Orchestral concert will remain prominent. More recently hybrid concerts are gaining popularity, classical music is being given a new dimension. This is done through the incorporation of electronic instruments together with traditional orchestral instruments. The result is a mixture of styles and timbres which marks the 21st century.

When I say that classical music is searching for new ways or that the classical music is getting a new face, what would come to your mind?

Classical music can be enjoyed in different ways. The traditional concert hall venue is being changed, classical music concerts can be experienced in different locations such as innovative stages set on water with the use of novel lighting and sound systems.

Do you think that the classical musician today needs to be more creative? What’s the role of creativity in the musical process for you?

Yes, I think creativity is a central aspect in music, since the musician or composer requires this tool to inspire the audiences and instil a love for music. For me the definition of composition is creativity therefore without creativity there is no music.

Do you think we musicians can do something to attract young generation into the classical music concerts? How will you proceed?

Yes, I think more promotion and awareness about classical music can help the younger generation appreciate and value the genre even more.

Tell us about your creative process. Do you have your favourite piece (written by you) How did you start working on it?

My creative process starts with inspiration, which can take the form of a memory, feeling, experience or encounter. The inspiration leads to the formation of a melody together with adjacent harmonic progressions. My favourite composition is Saulelydis which is a piece for solo piano, it was written for a dance project. Saulelydis is available here:

We, Moving Classics TV, love the combination of classical music with different disciplines: music and painting, music and cinematography, music and digital art, music and poetry. What do you think about these combinations?

I think that the combination of the different artistic disciplines highlights the fact of the inter-relatedness of the arts. The underlying element of these combinations is the creativity present in the different artistic expressions. The use of different artistic combinations plays an important role in storytelling in order to project one’s relationship with the universe.

Can you give some advice for young people who want to discover classical music for themselves?

I would advise to take up music lessons. Learning an instrument involves physical, mental and emotional discipline which helps maintain balance and structure within one’s existence.

Now it is a common practice in the media to talk that classical music is getting into the consumption business, do you agree? We are speaking about the supply and demand rules and how to sell your “product” in your case your compositions. How do you see it?

Well this is a challenging aspect of music. Some works of art are not fully appreciated and people might find it hard to understand all the energy, commitment and dedication an artist needs in order to achieve a certain level of mastery. One must keep in mind the current market value of works and not under- or over-estimate the “product”. Talking to colleagues and doing research within the music industry also helps the artist take informed decisions.

Do you have expectations with regards your listeners, your audience?

I hope that the audience enjoys and appreciates my music and that it enhances their mood or serves as a means of relaxation, enjoyment or entertainment.

What projects are coming up? Do you experiment in your projects?

For my upcoming project updates make sure to like my facebook page:

https://www.facebook.com/mariamifsudcomposer/

Yes, I do experiment with different techniques and instruments this depends on the particular project in question. I always enjoy new experimental and innovative challenges.

Official website: www.mariamifsud.com

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Polish composer Kamil Kosecki explains why when he composes music, he is full of deep feelings and how you can have a richer artist life through more creativity.

kamil kosecki foto

What does music mean to you personally?

Music is my all life. I spend a lot of time with music. I play many instruments and I also sing. It’s very difficult to describe it. Music is about emotions. Usually when I compose music I am full of thrills and deep feelings.

If you were not a professional musician, would would you have been?

If I were not a professional musician I would have been a painter or a filmmaker, graphic designer but only if I was born deaf.

The classical music audience is getting old, are you worried about your future?

I’m not worried about my future because I can’t force people to listened to modern music. It’s not their fault. As a modern composer I want to find the right way in composing music to convince them. I think that if you have something to say in music you will always have the audience.

Do you think that the classical musician today needs to be more creative? Whats the role of creativity in the musical process for you?

Yes, I think that the classical musician today needs to be more creative. Lately I had problem with a pianist who didn’t want to scream to the interior of the piano at the stage. It was a culmination of my piece. I think that the more creative you are the richer artist you become.

Tell us about your creative process. Do you have your favourite piece (written by you) How did you start working on it?

Sometimes I hear music in my mind, sometimes I compose with an instrument. It depends of what I want to compose. The most difficult and also an amazing process of composing is creating electronic music because You don’t know how your piece will sound at all. The most important thing for me is to create something new, individual and natural. ‘Natural’ means to me that all traditional classical music You love is behind You and You as a composer are the modern continuum. I always think about it when I compose. It’s hard to say If I have my favourite piece of my music.

I try to compose music that after some time I hear it, I don’t want to change it.

We, Moving Classics TV, love the combination of classical music with different disciplines: music and painting, music and cinematography, music and digital art, music and poetry. What do you think about these combinations?

It’s beautiful to combine music with different arts. My electronic piece “Collisions of galaxies” was part of a competition for filmmakers Screen&Sound Festival 2016 in Cracov. I’ve seen about ten movies created to my music. It was amazing for me to see this and that the movie with my music called ‘Through the AlterSpace’made by Magdalena Jemielity won this competition.

Now it is a common practice in the media to talk that the classical music is getting into the consumption business, do you agree? We are speaking about the supply and demand rules and how to sell your “product” in your case your compositions. How do you see it?

Yes, I agree. It’s because of the times we live but I’ve always had this idea in my mind about my profession: First – there is no art when You think about money, Second – When You think that there is no art when You think about money, the money will come.

What projects are coming up? Do you experiment in your projects?

Now I work on piece for saxophone and electronics. After that I will compose electric string quartet. Lately I work more on my individual style. I like experiments I ‘ve written many strange pieces in my past but now for me the more important aim is to compose something normal, fresh and modern.

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Bruce Stark shares his vision about the composing process, he tells us why his best work seems to happen when he is not trying hard to be original or experiment.

bruce stark foto

When I say that classical music is searching for new ways or that the classical music is getting a new face, what would come to your mind?

Presenting music in a visually attractive way is clearly a strong trend. In that sense I think many musicians are trying harder to appeal to audiences with interesting visual images. Youtube has made it a standard to experience music with video.

Do you think we musicians can do something to attract young generation into the classical music concerts? How will you proceed?

I think the predominance of Youtube as a listening/watching experience influences classical musicians to be more aware of the visual aspect, and appealing to audiences in this way.

Tell us about your creative process. Do you have your favorite piece (written by you) How did you start working on it?

No, I don’t have a particular favorite among my own pieces. There is no consistent pattern of how I compose. Usually I start a piece several times before I am satisfied enough to continue. Ideas come in a variety of ways. I work at the piano for small ensemble and solo pieces that contain the piano, because the physical aspect of the movement of hands often inspires ideas. When I compose for larger ensembles such as orchestra without piano, I often compose away from the piano. I usually revise pieces after their first performance. The creative process involves a lot of time and effort, but there is also a mysterious aspect that I don’t understand; I’m thankful that ideas come to me and accept the mystery.

We, Moving Classics TV, love the combination of classical music with different disciplines: music and painting, music and cinematography, music and digital art, music and poetry. What do you think about these combinations?

History is rich in examples of music combined with other art forms. And sometimes music which was created as absolute music is then borrowed for collaboration and takes on another life as part of something else. But the value and depth of the music probably required for that composer to approach it as absolute music and not be distracted by anything else. Other pieces have as their genesis a specific image or story or collaborative project. Both are valid. Most of my music is written as pure music for the concert stage, however some of my music has a specific story or intention that can be described in words.

Every new piece I compose is a new challenge, a new experiment for me. It doesn’t have to be an experiment with a new musical language or theoretical approach. Just the challenge of creating a good new work of the highest quality I am capable of is plenty of challenge and experimentation. My best work seems to happen when I am not trying hard to be original or experiment. It is a more natural, organic process, though it involves a great deal of self-criticism to produce something I am happy with.

http://www.brucestarkmusic.com/

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Alexandre Manhaes talks about why music is a way to reach something beyond ourselves. He speaks about the mystery of creation and why the classical music show come to people from its ivory tower.

alexander picture

What does music mean to you personally?

It is a way of trying to reach something beyond ourselves. Something that we can’t fully understand but is part of what we are and what we think of life.

Do you agree that music is all about fantasy?

By its nature music is and should always be about fantasy. When music is out of the realm of fantasy something in it is lost.

If you were not a professional musician, would would you have been?

I would like very much to be a professional who deals with form. Maybe a writer, a shoe maker, a carpenter.

The classical music audience is getting old, are you worried about your future?

Yes. Like almost everything nowadays which is made with a more refined quality is becoming more and more obsolete. Young people are trained to consume more from less.

What do you envision the role of classical music to be in the 21 century? Do you see that there is a transformation of this role?

It must be part of real life, not be placed, as sometimes happens, in an ivory tower.

When I say that classical music is searching for new ways or that the classical music is getting a new face, what would come to your mind?

Internet. It brought a broader new audience. Classical music was never so available as it is today.

Do you think that the classical musician today needs to be more creative? Whats the role of creativity in the musical process for you?

He/she must be creative at all times; they must have that hunger for excellence, but they have also to acquire new skills, be aware of the whole process of music: creation, production, distribution.

Do you think we musicians can do something to attract young generation into the classical music concerts? How will you proceed?

Yes, we do. I think that music should be treated as something of everyday life not be seen as a rare and unreachable event. People get afraid of this, so they don’t get involved.

Tell us about your creative process. Do you have your favourite piece (written by you) How did you start working on it?

If I’m working in a vocal piece, the text is my main guide as regarding melody (rhythm mainly ) and harmony; otherwise I rarely start a new piece with something previously in mind.

We, Moving Classics TV, love the combination of classical music with different disciplines: music and painting, music and cinematography, music and digital art, music and poetry. What do you think about these combinations?

It’s excellent. The most important is that each one of them feed and be fed by the other part equally.

Can you give some advice for young people who want to discover classical music for themselves?

Today we have internet. Go there and listen as much as you can without prejudice.

Now it is a common practice in the media to talk that the classical music is getting into the consumption business, do you agree? We are speaking about the supply and demand rules and how to sell your “product” in your case your compositions. How do you see it?

There is nothing wrong with it as long as quality and artistic integrity be in the front line of the whole process.

 

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“Expectations” by Igor Rabassa


New – Inspiring – Beautiful
Fantasy Notes Composer of the week: Igor Rabassa from Brazil
“Expectation”
Igor Rabassa “Before the first theme and during the piece conception I was thinking about images in my head. A tree leaf flying in the air. The melodic intervals leading the way to the flight and landing.” More in his interview