Jacob Koller known as The Mad Arranger tells us about his coming projects and his inspiration.

jacob koller

What does music mean to you personally?
Music is my method of communicating thoughts and emotion that I cannot properly express with words.

Do you agree that music is all about fantasy?
No. Music can be all types of things. It can be very literal or very abstract. However, the same music can have a completely different meaning depending on who is listening.

If you were not a professional musician, would would you have been?
Probably a school teacher because I love to teach.

The classical music audience is getting old, are you worried about your future?
I am not a straight classical artist so I don’t worry about my future. I think there will always be a future for classical music. As the younger generation gets older they will long for something more soothing and relaxing.

What do you envision the role of classical music to be in the 21 century? Do you see that there is a transformation of this role?
I feel that classical music has an image of being for the rich and elite. I think classical musicians need to find a way to communicate its beauty outside of the rich and elite world.

When I say that classical music is searching for new ways or that the classical music is getting a new face, what would come to your mind?
There are a lot of crossover musicians now combing classical music with pop, rock, jazz etc. There are also many new classical composers who are experimenting.

Do you think that the classical musician today needs to be more creative? Whats the role of creativity in the musical process for you?
Most classical musicians play and interpret the music of others. There is definitely a need for highly skilled players in order for composers to achieve their ideas. I am more of an arranger and composer. So creativity is everything to me. I am always looking for new ways to test the limits of my instrument and my own musicality.

Do you think we musicians can do something to attract young generation into the classical music concerts? How will you proceed?
We have to play for kids as much as possible and introduce them to all kinds of music. I play concerts for kids(often for very low pay and sometimes for free) at least once a month. We have to give back our gift of music and share it with kids who may never get a chance to see acoustic music live.

Tell us about your creative process. Do you have your favourite piece (written by you) How did you start working on it?
I’m composing and arranging all the time. I can’t really play the same piece exactly the same way twice. To me music is always evolving and even if I play an arrangement of a piece 100 times I am still thinking of different ways to play it.

We, Moving Classics TV, love the combination of classical music with different disciplines: music and painting, music and cinematography, music and digital art, music and poetry. What do you think about these combinations?
I’ve always been into music and film and often play video images of scenery that inspired my music at live concerts. There are so many possibilities of combining music with other art forms.

Can you give some advice for young people who want to discover classical music for themselves?
You just said it in the question. You have to discover it for yourself. Go to concerts, listen to recordings, play with many other musicians. Figure out what inspires you. Don’t be afraid to try a bunch of different things until you figure out which direction you want to go in.

Now it is a common practice in the media to talk that the classical music is getting into the consumption business, do you agree? We are speaking about the supply and demand rules and how to sell your “product” in your case your compositions. How do you see it?
Music should first and foremost be about your art. But for most people, including myself, we have to provide for our families so if I can’t make money doing music that means I have to do something else which means I will have little to no time for music. Most musicians I knows have had to struggle with this balance in life.

What projects are coming up? Do you experiment in your projects?
All my projects are experiments. My next project is an all original album inspired by forests and nature in general called “Healing Forest.” Nature has always been my biggest inspiration and one of my gravest concerns for the future. I have never done a project like this but am very excited to release it.

 

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Canadian composer and poet Claude Lachapelle shares his views about the great music, how he discovered his passion in life and why it takes patience to discover music.

claude lachapelle

What does music mean to you personally?

For me, music is a passion, appreciation and a therapy. Around the age of 14 or 15 years, I was a difficult teenager and when I started doing music, my behavior has changed radically; I discovered in the music the beauty, wonder, and spirituality

Do you agree that music is all about fantasy?

For me, music is more than a fantasy; it is an ideal, a breath of life, an escape, a creation and sometimes a job.

If you were not a professional musician, would would you have been?

I have never been a professional musician, i do not make a living making music. I never had any external pressure to compose music.

The classical music audience is getting old, are you worried about your future?

Not because young people will discover the great* music one day and they will be the audience of tomorrow.
* I like to use the word (great) better than the (classical) word, which represents a time in the history of music.

What do you envision the role of classical music to be in the 21 century? Do you see that there is a transformation of this role?

Great music will always have a place in the 21st century: cinema, concerts, television and new composers who will bring originality and novelty through their scholarly works.

When I say that classical music is searching for new ways or that the classical music is getting a new face, what would come to your mind?

I believe that she is looking for new ways to please the public through different marketing experiences that are in my view quite effective.

Do you think that the classical musician today needs to be more creative? Whats the role of creativity in the musical process for you?

Yes, the musician must be ever more creative; creativity must play an important role in the musical process, in its form, through its instrumentation and in the modernity of its time.

Do you think we musicians can do something to attract young generation into the classical music concerts? How will you proceed?

Introduce youth to music at the elementary level and pursue this approach further in high school; we should also reduce the cost of concert tickets for those 30 and under.

Tell us about your creative process.

When I want to compose music, I usually sit at the piano and improvise. So ideas come and I develop them. After I write them on paper (musical score) not to forget them. Then I go to the computer to transfer my ideas. And that’s often where magic is created. The computer is such a wonderful tool. It gives us extraordinary technical possibilities.

We, Moving Classics TV, love the combination of classical music with different disciplines: music and painting, music and cinematography, music and digital art, music and poetry. What do you think about these combinations?

Excellent idea to combine different disciplines; I myself use poetry and music in my personal art.

Can you give some advice for young people who want to discover classical music for themselves?

If you want to persevere in knowing better the great music, you have to be open to all musical genres. (Duo, trio, quartet, symphony, concerto, opera, etc.) We must also not be afraid to explore different forms and structures in music (ABA, rondeau, canon, waltz) and even more complex forms (Sonata, variations, fugue). Patience and tenacity are important qualities for anyone venturing into the wonderful world of great music.

Now it is a common practice in the media to talk that the classical music is getting into the consumption business, do you agree? We are speaking about the supply and demand rules and how to sell your “product” in your case your compositions. How do you see it?

Yes, the music must be perceived as a consumer product like the bread of the baker, the work of the composer also has a pecuniary value.

Do you have expectations what regards your listeners, your audience?

We always have some expectations from the audience, but the ultimate reward for the musician or the composer is to feel understood and listened to in the faithful and sincere look of the listeners.

What projects are coming up?

I recently signed a contract with a publishing house to publish a collection of poems that I wrote; the title is (Romances without notes). I also continue to compose music.

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[PROMO] Works for Contemporary Clarinet – Domenico Calia


From the booklet: “Over the centuries, the continuing evolution of the clarinet faced many transformations, both in style and construction. The clarinet, therefore, like other instruments, became a distinctive feature of its era, echoing its spirit and turning into an undisputed protagonist. Alongside Mozart and Brahms masterpieces, there is one of the widest literature ever written for an instrument, which has been fascinating performers and composers and time does not seem to scratch.” by Edmondo Filippini Find Da Vinci Edition Online: Homepage: https://davinci-edition.com/ Newsletter: http://eepurl.com/cB3S9b

Lebanese-French organist, composer, and improviser who succeeded Messiaen as organist talks about his art, why music is the "word of the unspeakable" and about his love of the melody.

Naji Hakim

What does music mean to you personally?
„Music is the word of the unspeakable.“ This makes reference to the verse 14 of John’s Gospel Chapter 1 : « And the Word was made flesh ». I live in the Holy presence of God and wish that all my activities including music serve and glorify him by inspiring Joy to the heart of the listeners.

Do you agree that music is all about fantasy?
If fantasy (from Greek phantasia) is the „power of imagination“, the inspiration, then it is a manifestation of a divine grace. As in other arts, it is a beautiful reward stemming out of order, logic, rigor, technique, craftmanship, time, patience, obstination, calculation and reason.
If you were not a professional musician, what would you have been?
Your humble servant : shoe shiner, server in a fine dining restaurant or teacher.
The classical music audience is getting old, are you worried about your future?
« Worry » whether in music, health, geopolitics, or in any other field is a common disease of our time thirsting more than ever for the « above all ». But I have the conviction that “The beauty of the beauties («pulchritudo pulchrorum omnium») will save the world”. (Dostoyevsky and Saint Augustin)  Future of music is to be considered through a distant scale of observation of the past centuries, with the « hope » (a theological virtue) that we are getting to a new « renaissance ». I hope the resurrection of folklore and the rediscovery of the treasures of the past be parts of it. « Therefore do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry about itself. Each day has enough trouble of its own. » Mat. 6, 34

What do you envision the role of classical music to be in the 21 century? Do you see that there is a transformation of this role?
Having been teaching music analysis for 30 years, I realise how important it is to maintain a genealogical line with the composers of the past and follow their examples. As Verdi writes: „Tornate all’antico e sarà un progresso. » (Let us turn to the past: that will be progress.)
There is certainly a distorsion in the course of genealogy, coinciding with the Arnold Schönberg’s dodecaphonic series system and its plural troubling consequences, or by several philosophical/ideological currents. But as we say in French : « Chassez le naturel, il revient au galop » (when what is natural is driven off, it returns at a gallop). In this respect, Olivier Messiaen’s following sentence is self-explanatory : ” Musique sérielle, musique dodécaphonique, musique atonale… Le résultat est identique. On a aboli la résonance. Le reste, fonctions tonales ou forme sonate, disparaît sans que cela me préoccupe. Mais, sans résonance, seul demeure un sentiment de noirceur “. “Serial music, dodecaphonic music, atonal music … The result is the same. The resonance (harmonic series) has been abolished. The rest, tonal functions or sonata form, disappear without worrying me. But, without resonance, only remains a feeling of darkness “.

When I say that classical music is searching for new ways or that the classical music is getting a new face, what would come to your mind?
Convincing new ways draw always their substance from harmonic series and/or modality, with a reference to melody and dance. „La mélodie, toujours la mélodie, voilà le seul et unique secret de notre art.“ (Melody, always melody, this is the sole and unique secret of our art.) Charles Gounod

Do you think that the classical musician today needs to be more creative? What is the role of creativity in the musical process for you?
As each of my works has a different genesis, the creativity remains a mystery. Once I have finished a work it is difficult to me to realize all the work I have done… There must be a spiritual presence pushing me ahead. Veni creator spiritus!

Do you think we musicians can do something to attract young generation into the classical music concerts? How will you proceed?
You remind me of a question I asked to my orchestration teacher, Serge Nigg, when I became analysis professor myself : „Maître, what advice would you give me for my teaching? “ He answered : „You know all the technical things you need for your class. I have only one advice : Love your students!“ To complete this testimony, I would quote Carl-Philipp Emmanuel Bach : „you have to be moved yourself, to be able to move others. ”
Practically, I would never program a work I don’t love from the bottom of my heart. Unfortunately I had to do it in the past and still regret it very deeply.

Tell us about your creative process. Do you have your favourite piece (written by you) How did you start working on it?

Would you ask me which one of my children I prefer? … I smile. Honestly, the work I cherish most is the one I am working on. I am writing now a 5th organ concerto (organ, string orchestra and timpani). I write all the work prior to start orchestrating it. I have orchestrated two of the three movements and already forgot how I started the composition! (I would have to get to my sketches. That’s why the study of sketches and drafts could help following the different steps of a composition.) But I can tell I have used free thematic material as well as an old moving byzantine melody for the last movement. I have a strong concern for harmony, melodic variation and getting distinct melodies above the vox prius facta (the part written first).

We, Moving Classics TV, love the combination of classical music with different disciplines: music and painting, music and cinematography, music and digital art, music and poetry. What do you think about these combinations?
Besides vocal music, I agree that instrumental music could be associated, conjugated with painting and poetry. Here are three examples :
- In my Sinfonia in honore Sancti Ioannis Bautistae, there is an artwork for the cover based on a painting by Bartolomé Esteban Murillo representing The infant St John the Baptist, http://ump.co.uk/catalogue/naji-hakim-sinfonia-in-honore-sancti-johannes-baptistae/
and each movement is preceeded by a biblical quotation.

https://www.najihakim.com/works/organ-solo/sinfonia-in-honore-sancti-ioannis-bautistae/

- In my recent Sonate pour harpe, each movement is preceded by poetical verses by my daughter Katia-Sofía Hakim (published in February 2018 by Schott Music)

- The manuscript of my Sakskøbing Præludier for chamber ensemble is in polychromic calligraphy, i.e. 12 different inks with different pens. This 12 movements work is based on Danish hymns and the colors follow the theological lines of the poetical texts.

Can you give some advice for young people who want to discover classical music for themselves?
It is a passion (patio, suffering). I really don’t know. It is as giving an advice for anyone to how to fall in love.

Now it is a common practice in the media to talk that the classical music is getting into the consumption business, do you agree? We are speaking about the supply and demand rules and how to sell your “product” in your case your compositions. How do you see it?
We are forced to live in a consumer „mammonic“ society. It is a form of „hell“. „You cannot serve God and Mammon“ Matt 6, 24 Only a spiritual life would help mankind to get out of this vicious circle. In the 1970, Robert Beauvais wrote a book entitled „L’hexagonal tel qu’on le parle“ in which he gives ironically a new definition for a masterpiece : „Le chef d’oeuvre est une oeuvre dont on parle“ (The masterpiece is a work of which we speak). Which means people are deprived of their own judgment. Parents and teachers have the responsibility to lead younger generations to develop their own judgment and… « Behold, I send you forth as sheep in the midst of wolves: be ye therefore wise as serpents, and harmless as doves. » Mat. 10, 16

Do you have expectations what regards your listeners, your audience?
My listeners and audience are the sheep on the right hand of the father. I hope they know that my music and I love them. I don’t want to disappoint them.

What projects are coming up? Do you experiment in your projects?
I look forward to conducting in January the Lebanese Philharmonic Orchestra in Beirut my homeland, with a program dedicated to my own compositions and accompany a wind quintet concert with three of my works. 23.01.18, Amphithéâtre Pierre Aboukhater, Beyrouth, LBN
Beirut Philharmonic Wind Quintet
Ana Suhaila, Flute – Oleg Balanuta, Oboe – Octavian Gheorghiu, Clarinet – Ionut Emil Mardare, Bassoon – Gabriel Mihaita Raileanu, Horn – Naji Hakim, Piano
Naji Hakim : Carnaval for wind quintet
Naji Hakim : Suite Française for wind quintet (World premiere)
Naji Hakim : Rondo for wind quintet and piano (World premiere)
26.01.18, église de l’Université Saint-Joseph, Beyrouth, LBN
Mario Rahi, violon – Orchestre Philharmonique du Liban -
Direction, Naji Hakim
Naji Hakim : Ouverture Libanaise
Naji Hakim : Sindbad pour orchestre (Création mondiale)
Naji Hakim : Concerto pour violon et orchestre à cordes
Naji Hakim : Trois Danses Basques

MERRY CHRISTMAS!

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“Carol of the Bells” by Guy Bacos


Anna Sutyagina plays “Carol of the Bells” by Guy Bacos from “Christmas Suite”
Arrangements of Christmas traditional songs in a personal rendition. Score available through gbacos@sympatico.ca

“All’Italiana” by Tao Mijares


New Classics for our Times Contemporary composer Tao Mijares and his “All’Italiana” per Piano Solo from “Novem Praeludia”
All’Italiana is about the happiness that give fortitude to the Italian people, the way they overcome their struggles with a smile.

http://movingclassics.tv/fantasy-notes-interview-with-composer-writer-and-film-director-tao-mijares/

Vincenzo Sorrentino – Works Vol.1: Wind Chamber Music


Composer: Vincenzo Sorrentino (1973–2013)
Label: Da Vinci Classics
Genre: Chamber Music
Period: 21th Century
Catalogue No: C00011
Barcode: 0806810877913

From the booklet: “Vincenzo Sorrentino was born on 21 September 1973 in Nola. His musical education, enriched with humanities unfortunately unfinished, took place at the Music Conservatory “Domenico Cimarosa” of Avellino where , in 1996, he graduated in Piano and in 2002 in Composition. In 2007 he completed his Diploma in Composition with a Master Degree and in 2011 with a Diploma in Electronic Music.”

Find Da Vinci Edition Online:

 https://davinci-edition.com/2017/11/15/vincenzo-sorrentino/

Homepage: https://davinci-edition.com/

Newsletter: http://eepurl.com/cB3S9b

Design and art direction by 一般社団法人 Osaka Mozart Association
Produced by 一般社団法人 Osaka Mozart Association
The copyright in this sound recording and artwork is owned by Osaka Mozart Association