Vincenzo Sorrentino – Works Vol.1: Wind Chamber Music


Composer: Vincenzo Sorrentino (1973–2013)
Label: Da Vinci Classics
Genre: Chamber Music
Period: 21th Century
Catalogue No: C00011
Barcode: 0806810877913

From the booklet: “Vincenzo Sorrentino was born on 21 September 1973 in Nola. His musical education, enriched with humanities unfortunately unfinished, took place at the Music Conservatory “Domenico Cimarosa” of Avellino where , in 1996, he graduated in Piano and in 2002 in Composition. In 2007 he completed his Diploma in Composition with a Master Degree and in 2011 with a Diploma in Electronic Music.”

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 https://davinci-edition.com/2017/11/15/vincenzo-sorrentino/

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Design and art direction by 一般社団法人 Osaka Mozart Association
Produced by 一般社団法人 Osaka Mozart Association
The copyright in this sound recording and artwork is owned by Osaka Mozart Association

Liam Pitcher is talking about exciting projects that will support a shift in the global perception of music and about the joy of merging classical and electronic music in order to pave a road forward.

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What does music mean to you personally?

To me, music is about conveying something. Every piece of music has inherent meaning, and conveys something about the composer, whether that message is positive or negative.

Do you agree that music is all about fantasy?

No. Music can represent anything, from fact to fiction, and even a combination of the two.

If you were not a professional musician, would would you have been?

It’s impossible to say, although I will say that many fields interest me, including sport, economics, architecture, mathematics and science.

The classical music audience is getting old, are you worried about your future?

I’m not, although I think a lot of people should be. Apart from classical music composition, I am also an electronic music producer, and so I have no fear of being left behind.

What do you envision the role of classical music to be in the 21 century? Do you see that there is a transformation of this role?

I think that people will look back on this period in history as the ‘film music’ era, or the ‘pop music era’, or the ‘electronic music era’. Classical music has been largely overlooked, although it is supposedly utilized in films and games – however the standard of these ‘classical’ works is questionable. Unfortunately, orchestras are being replaced by electronic music libraries, and most of the music heard on television and in movies and games are electronically arranged, making the music performer redundant.

When I say that classical music is searching for new ways or that the classical music is getting a new face, what would come to your mind?

Classical music needs to be integrated largely into pop culture; it’s the only way for music growth and development to take place. At the moment, the system is stunting music development. Classical music’s face is the same as it has always been, however we have seen a shift in the amount of people who appreciate it.

Do you think that the classical musician today needs to be more creative? Whats the role of creativity in the musical process for you?

In my opinion, classical music and electronic music need to be merged in order to pave a road forward. The issue is that classical musicians largely have no interest in integrating themselves into the electronic music scene, and electronic producers largely have no formal training in music.

Do you think we musicians can do something to attract young generation into the classical music concerts? How will you proceed?

Classical musicians need to improve their business senses and be open to the incorporation of electronic music into the classical sphere. Most classical musicians have absolutely no idea how to promote themselves effectively, and there are too many false musicians in and amongst them with better business senses who are currently at the top of their game, regardless of their musical abilities.

Tell us about your creative process. Do you have your favourite piece (written by you) How did you start working on it?

I’m currently working on a debut electronic art music album, and I wouldn’t be able to choose a favorite piece from it, they are all very close to me. In terms of my creative process; when I write a classical piece of music, I will either begin with an improvisation and refine it – resulting in tonal and diatonic works in a neo romantic/baroque infusion style, or I will begin with a motivic or structural idea and develop it, resulting in a more post-modern late-romantic style. When I write electronic music, I always have a pre-determined idea and set of limitations about the piece I want to write.

We, Moving Classics TV, love the combination of classical music with different disciplines: music and painting, music and cinematography, music and digital art, music and poetry. What do you think about these combinations?

Once again, conveying meaning through music is important to me, and programmatic music is a big part of that. I teach all my students how to correctly convey certain imagery and poetry in their music.

Can you give some advice for young people who want to discover classical music for themselves?

There is an ocean of music available on streaming services like YouTube, go out and explore it, and if you can, try and support the artists which you appreciate the most.

Now it is a common practice in the media to talk that the classical music is getting into the consumption business, do you agree? We are speaking about the supply and demand rules and how to sell your “product” in your case your compositions. How do you see it?

I think that music has largely become a commodity and that the focus is primarily on the sell and not the expression. This is the problem which has led to the current state of the industry. Record labels, radio stations, DSPs and other platforms for artists need to focus more on musicality and music development, and less on their own personal agenda when choosing which artists to support.

Do you have expectations what regards your listeners, your audience?

No. I hope that everybody who listens to my music can have their own interpretation. Music should be open to interpretation, and I try not to be too descriptive when explaining what my works are about to me, in order not to influence the experience of my listeners.

What projects are coming up? Do you experiment in your projects?

Currently, I’m writing many short piano compositions, as well as a piano sonata and violin sonata. I also have a debut electronic album in the works, as I mentioned before. Apart from that, I’m working on a very exciting project in the music and tech spaces which I hope will aid in a shift in the global perception of music, and support niche and greatly overlooked artists in this largely popularized industry.

 

 

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Fox

Fox


Dreamy piano music

Vincenzo Silvestris talks about how to avoid prejudice against style and musical genre and why the task of the musician should be to call the audience’s attention to the beauty that the music itself has inside.

What does music mean to you personally?

Music has been my life since I was young. At the age of five/six years old I was blown away by listening the 5th Symphony by Beethoven. Like in the movie Immortal Beloved, I flew high in the black starry sky for a few seconds and soon after I fell down on the earth. At the parish youth club a nun ( the piano teacher) asked my mother if I wanted to study the piano because I liked listening to her lessons when I walked around. I said “yes!“

Do you agree that music is all about fantasy?

Music is all about fantasy but to feed fantasy it is necessary to study hard, too!

If you were not a professional musician, what would you have been?

At the age of fifteen I wanted to become an electronic engineer. Orazio Svelto was my father’s friend. He is one of the pioneers in the international field of laser physics and its application. I told him I wanted to study engineering. But he told me:“ music or engineering, you choose !“. I chose music! Electronic engineering is still in my heart but only like a hobby!

The classical music audience is getting old, are you worried about your future?

I am worried about the future but I hope that school will let know the new generations the beauty of classical music and the work that there is behind.

What do you envision the role of classical music to be in the 21 century? Do you see that there is a transformation of this role?

I can‘t see a transformation of the role of classical music because I think that the power of this kind of music is the no-transformation. I think that the role of the classical musicians is in transformation.

When I say that classical music is searching for new ways or that the classical music is getting a new face, what would come to your mind?

I think the attitude of the classical musicians is a change (not for everybody). They are closer to the people, but this was what happened in the past. Lots of classical musicians forgot this or they want to forget it… I was thinking of singers and violin soloists in a concert with orchestra when the Opera was born.

Do you think that the classical musician today needs to be more creative? What’s the role of creativity in the musical process for you?

I don’t think that the classical musicians have to be more creative, because creativity is a personal skill and it depends on the culture of the musicians.

Do you think we musicians can do something to attract young generation into the classical music concerts? How will you proceed?

In my opinion young people don’t need to be persuaded into classical concerts. I usually think the guys have no prejudices. Maybe musicians have prejudices against music. However I think it’s better to select a musical program suitable for them, which contains some samples of different styles of music; but this is a personal choice.

Tell us about your creative process. Do you have your favourite piece (written by you) How did you start working on it?

I started my career by writing a composition for piano, looking for an emotion: through it I found a melody, a rythm, a dynamism , a colour. When it began to take shape, I put it on the staff. Looking at the notes on the staff again and again, I came up with the idea to develop the composition. This is not the first time that it happens in the history of composition. Before 1750 and after 1900, looking for the “pleasing to the ears“ was not a priority for the composers. Then I continued looking for a development. Now I do this with the help of the parameters of the music grammar and always under control of my feelings.

We, Moving Classics TV, love the combination of classical music with different disciplines: music and painting, music and cinematography, music and digital art, music and poetry. What do you think about these combinations?

The combination of classical music with different disciplines is very stimulating but every language (every discipline has its own language) must be its grammar in this process. Common meanings can be found in the specific parameters of each discipline but it is important to point out to the “signifier“ of the ideas you want to develop

Can you give some advice for young people who want to discover classical music for themselves?

I can give young people some advice: listening to classical music and going to concerts of classical music. Then, if they want to study music, it should be better to tell them that talented people are almost always the result of a daily and very hard study!

Now it is a common practice in the media to talk that the classical music is getting into the consumption business, do you agree? We are speaking about the supply and demand rules and how to sell your “product” in your case your compositions. How do you see it?

I think that it’s important to be in this system. If I want to change something, I can’t do it from outside but from inside…

Do you have expectations what regards your listeners, your audience?

I’d like my listeners had the same passion for music like mine. I think that the task of the musician must be to call the audience’s attention to the beauty that the music itself has inside. For example, if there is a beatiful moon in the sky, I tell my son: “Lorenzo! !There is the moon!!!Look!!“ This is more than enough and the moon is beautiful for itself!

What projects are coming up? Do you experiment in your projects?

My next project is a new album with music for piano solo but….. I’m not sure it’ll be for piano solo…
In my projects I try to find always something new . I go to any direction, without any prejudice against style and musical genre.

 

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Takashi Yoshimatsu, one of the most prolific and popular of contemporary Japanese composers, talks about his "children"-musical compositions, about searching for individual way and why Professors of compositions would advice their students not to become composers.

What does music mean to you personally?

It is a “language” different from words, a “numerical formula” different from mathematics. And my works are what I gave birth to, meaning they are my “children.”

Do you agree that music is all about fantasy?

It is a kind of fantasy that sometimes seems more real than reality.

If you were not a professional musician, what would you have been?

Originally I thought I would be a scholar or a doctor (or perhaps a writer or a manga(cartoon) artist). Becoming a musician was something completely unexpected.

The classical music audience is getting old, are you worried about your future?

In the 1960s, when I got into the music field, I didn’t imagine that classical music and orchestras would survive into the 21st century. So even though I’m not really optimistic, I can’t say I’m pessimistic either. I feel like the same is true for both music and people.

Tell us about your creative process. Do you have your favorite piece (written by you)? How did you start working on it?

The fact that music can be described in a “score,” making it possible to manage all formats from solos to huge ensembles performed on instruments from all times and places, and to program (and reproduce) “works”—I was interested in this and made “composition” my life’s work.

As a result, I’ve been able to make music with various musicians, orchestras and ensembles (from Western instruments to Japanese instruments and even jazz and rock). To me, the works born from these experiences are new personalities (children) combining the DNA of myself and the musicians. I think the same is true in the case of film and writing and painting as well.

Can you give some advice for young people who want to discover classical music for themselves?

This is quite paradoxical, but I’d probably tell young people, “Don’t get absorbed in classical music.” The reason is that, like me, they’ll put everything they have into it and spend their whole lives on it. I heard that the first thing my teacher would tell students in his classes in the university composition department was, “Don’t think about becoming a composer.”

Now it is a common practice in the media to talk that the classical music is getting into the consumption business, do you agree? We are speaking about the supply and demand rules and how to sell your “product” in your case your compositions. How do you see it? Do you have expectations what regards your listeners, your audience?

When I first aspired to be a composer, I never imagined a future other than one in which my works would never be performed or earn a single yen or have an audience, and I would die poor. A mother has children without thinking, “How much will this child cost?” or “How much can I earn by having this child?” It was like that. In the end (and very fortunately), I’ve been able to making a fair living without dying poor, but I didn’t go into music with a vision or plan for survival. That is why I have no answer in this regard.

 

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Narrow is the way (Official Video)


Official video for “Narrow is the way”, taken from the new album “Secret Book”, out on May 12th 2017

Pre – orders:

http://www.memorec.bandcamp.com

Music video by Fabrizio Paterlini performing Narrow is the way.
(C) 2017 Memory Recordings

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Jackie Perks talks about how she "dreams" music and sees the "imagery" to go with the music. She gives advice for young people and shares her passion for youtube!

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What does music mean to you personally?

To me, music is life. It is everywhere. It is in the air we breathe, the water we drink and the greatest universal language known.

Do you agree that music is all about fantasy?

Yes!! In fact, I share this philosophy with you Anna. From the time I was a very small child, I began to “dream” music, the imagery firing up so brilliantly in my mind. I experience the same thing when I go to the symphony! Notes in the air transform into beautiful and vivid imagery!

If you were not a professional musician, would you have been?

At this point the only professional work I have been paid for was the use of my Tom Waits improvisation of “Invitation to The Blues” in the HBO Documentary, “Requiem for the Dead, An American Spring”. This was a great honor for me! I wanted to be a concert pianist growing up, but also had other interests, namely Biology and the medical field and was considering this, too. However, after a terrible car accident permanently damaged some nerves, I lost a bit of speed and dexterity, so I could not become a concert pianist. Surprisingly, I also shifted my focus to business, so my actual career is in corporate with heavy emphasis on sales and marketing. After many years off of playing and lots of physical therapy, I came back to it. There was a hole in my life without a piano and the ability to make music and my husband “saved me” with the surprise gift of a piano. He knew it was in my soul and I remember the tears of joy I cried when I received it. Now I am very thankful to still be able to play. I work hard on my dexterity issues and have adapted my playing style now. Due to heavy time constraints, I am on a slow path to record and make albums, but it will happen. However, I do have all my original music scored and available for purchase at this time. All my performances are recorded and available to view on YouTube, as well.

The classical music audience is getting old, are you worried about your future?

I do worry a little about the future, but I truly believe that the ageless, timeless nature of the music and its ability to move the soul will never die. There will always be room in the hearts of new listeners to appreciate classical music. I believe parents can have a great influence on their children with this, as well, by getting them involved in music, giving lessons in musical instruments, and attending live concerts and symphonies to support them.

What do you envision the role of classical music to be in the 21 century? Do you see that there is a transformation of this role?

I think that music is always evolving and new forms emerge based upon the older disciplines. There are always ways to keep it fresh and new. However, the known forms are already so perfect that I believe they will still continue to be studied, preserved, and played for many, many years to come!

When I say that classical music is searching for new ways or that the classical music is getting a new face, what would come to your mind?

What comes to mind are ways to reach a younger audience, to get them (and keep them) interested and excited about it and the many ways it can be presented.

Do you think that the classical musician today needs to be more creative? Whats the role of creativity in the musical process for you?

I believe that musicians have always had to be somewhat creative, but even more so today with the advent of social media and the multitude of ways to present visuals to pique the interest of the listener. There are numerous presentation avenues to showcase one’s work and creativity. For me, creativity comes from taking prose and poetry on existing works, as well as writing my own music. What further fuels my creativity are the powerful visuals that form in my mind when I listen to (or create) music!! Creativity is part of the entire process and very, very important!

Do you think we musicians can do something to attract young generation into the classical music concerts? How will you proceed?

As stated previously, I honestly believe that it all begins at home. The influence of parents and family are very important. The younger generation will continue where we left off.

Tell us about your creative process. Do you have your favourite piece (written by you) How did you start working on it?

My creative process for composing always begins with “music playing in my head”. This has been happening to me since age 4 when I asked my parents for my first piano. I “dream” music in beautiful colors that I almost cannot explain. It usually happens in the wee hours near dawn and I awake with this music fresh in my mind. I have also been known to get out of bed and just start playing or recording my ideas in the dark, as powerful visuals unfold in my mind. There are other moments where a powerful conversation will even cause music to come to mind and soon thereafter, I usually run to my piano, blank music sheets in hand. Then there are those moments in life that inspire….a beautiful day, time spent reflecting at the water’s edge, the smell after a rain, and so much more. Interestingly enough, I did not formally compose any of my music until just a few short years ago and will never look back again! I am not sure I have a favorite work that I have written as they are all inherently different. Some are freeform improvisations, while others are more structured works. Examples of freeform improvs are “Forbidden Love” and “The Connection”. Examples of structured works are, “Nocturne in C-Sharp Minor”, “Waltz in C Minor”, “Love”, “Opus No. 17 in G Minor (Toxic)”, “Free to Fly”, and my latest work, “Raindrop Fantasia”. I also have a few works infused with whispers of modern jazz and blues, “Into The Blue” and “Autumn in Blue”. The works I have written that have the greatest emotional impact however are different. For example, my “Opus No. 17 in G Minor (Toxic)” was written last year during a time of extreme grief, the night I found out my only sister was dying, so very dark, deep, personal, and painful. In my performance, I am literally sobbing all over my keyboard and could barely finish. I am in the habit of having my recorder on while playing, but was not even going to keep it or post it, but my husband insisted that I keep it raw as he loved it. His feeling was that the emotion could never be recreated the same way again and now I am glad I preserved it. That same performance remains on my YouTube channel. The other was the piece I wrote to honor my sister after her death. “Free to Fly” was the music that embodied the notion that she is free to explore and dance the cosmos/heavens until we meet again. My sadness is there, but also my acceptance. She was a beautiful person that gave to all and there will never be a day that goes by that I don’t think of my precious and beautiful Kristin. So, in the end, the creative process of the composer is born of FEELINGS, some happy, some sad.

We, Moving Classics TV, love the combination of classical music with different disciplines: music and painting, music and cinematography, music and digital art, music and poetry. What do you think about these combinations?

As I am an extremely visual person, I agree with this wholeheartedly!! Visuals are so very important to evoke memories and emotions as it paints a tapestry of musical colors for the listener, while allowing the artist full expression of what is in his/her soul.

Can you give some advice for young people who want to discover classical music for themselves?

Don’t be afraid to be yourself!! Open your mind to the music and allow it to become part of your life. Listen, share, and if playing an instrument, create fearlessly what is in your mind and don’t allow peer pressure to steer your ship when it comes to music. Ask your parents to take you to a concert, the symphony, help you purchase a recording, or ask to take lessons on a musical instrument. I was one of those kids that listened to rock and roll and other genres of music, but also went to the symphony and loved it! I listened to classical music as a teenager, too and was the ONLY one among my friends that did this. I did not steer away from it or apologize for it as I enjoyed my uniqueness. Nothing could have ripped me away from the magical beauty of Classical music and especially the music of the Romantic period. Once I experienced the magic of Chopin and Liszt, I was inspired and hooked for life.

Now it is a common practice in the media to talk that the classical music is getting into the consumption business, do you agree? We are speaking about the supply and demand rules and how to sell your “product” in your case your compositions. How do you see it?

I do agree. I think that with the advent of social media platforms, the works are being shared even more and Classical music is being given a new face and a new start. This also means that there is much more competition in the marketplace. I do sell my compositions in sheet music form and hope to be able to put together an album with my recorded works in the future as aforementioned, so I cannot speak to album sales at this time. I am hopeful that interest in Classical music will never go out of style and that I will enjoy playing and sharing my works well into old age. Of course it’s also my dream that people continue to enjoy my music long after I am gone.

Do you have expectations what regards your listeners, your audience?

I do not have any expectations whatsoever. I only ask that they listen fully, with eyes, ears and minds wide open to what the music is saying. I want them to allow the music to sink in deeply, touch their souls, and even create powerful visuals in their own minds as they listen. Music is highly therapeutic in my opinion.

What projects are coming up? Do you experiment in your projects?

I have no projects coming up per se, as I write my music as it “comes to me”. I cannot control the muse. When the music comes, it is usually inspired by something, a dream, an event, a beautiful moment, a smell, a visual and something that I cannot plan in advance. If I had more time, I would love to do more projects and even collaborate with other musicians, artists, poets, and singers, but corporate life only allows me so much time (at least for now)! I am in the process of having a website built for me and will slowly move toward planning and creating an album for release. In the meantime, I am on YouTube for anyone to see. I am wide open here and my heart welcomes any and all that want to watch and listen, even my imperfect moments as that is also part of who we all are….through trial, error and adversity, we achieve our best.

 

 

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Where I am (Official Video)


When Ed contacted me about his short series of animations about the planet Pluto, asking me if he could use my music, I immediately felt the final result would have been something special.
So here it is, a space trip with my “Where I am” music in the background. Hope you will enjoy!

Video: Ed Bell, edbelldesign.com

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